1. Undergraduate Minors
  2. English

English| Minor

Students can use an English minor to further their undergraduate studies and give them a comprehensive background in literary and writing skills.

Required Courses for An English Minor

Students must take a minimum of 15 Semester Credits, starting with:

  • EN 140 Principles of Critical Analysis (3 Semester Hours)

    This course is an introduction to aims, methodology and terminology of literary criticism through the study of texts written in a variety of forms (including fiction, non-fiction, and poetry) and drawn from a variety of cultural traditions.

  • EN 220 Major British Writers (3 Semester Hours)

    Course is a study of British literature from the Angelo-Saxon period to modern times, intended to provide an overview of significant historical and literary movements including medievalism, Renaissance, Restoration, neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism and postmodernism.

  • EN 221 Major American Writers (3 Semester Hours)

    This course is a study of American literature from the 17th century to modern times. This course is intended to provide an overview of the significant historical and literary movements, including colonialism, federalism, romanticism, realism, modernism and postmodernism.

Students must also take three semester credits from the English Minor Group 1 Selection:

  • EN 327 The Neoclassical Age (3 Semester Hours)

    Neoclassical Age (1660-1898) includes the Restoration (1660-1700), in which Milton, Bunyan and Dryden were the dominant influences. The Augustan Age (1700-1750) in which Pope was the central poetic figure, while Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, and Smollett were presiding over the sophistication of the novel. Course also covers the age of Johnson (1750-1798).

  • EN 328 The Romantic Age (3 Semester Hours)

    This is a study of the Romantic period of British literature (1798-1830) in poetry, essays, novels and critical works by a number of influential writers. Political, economic, social, intellectual and religious issues and events that shaped and were shaped by Romantic literature will be considered.

  • EN 329 The Victorian Age (3 Semester Hours)

    This course is a study of the Victorian period of British literature (1837-1901) in prose, poetry and fiction, specifically on the novel, as it rapidly developed into a significant literary genre. Course considers political, economic, social, intellectual and religious issues and events that shaped and were shaped by this literature. Such considerations will include the roles of race, ethnicity, gender and glass, as well as the issues of colonial expansion of the British Empire prior to and throughout Victoria's reign.

  • EN 345 Old English and Medieval Literature (3 Semester Hours)

    Course will study literature from the Earliest English texts through approximately the fifteenth century. This classes uses mainly texts in translation, topics, works, and authors include Beowulf, Chaucer, Dante, Malory, Arthurian legend, women and writing, and other medieval themes and genres. The primary focus will be works by British writers, though writing by Medieval European authors may also be explored.

  • EN 346 Tudor and Stuart Literature (3 Semester Hours)

    This is a study of Renaissance literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on major authors, genres, and themes as well as the significant artistic and political events of the period.

  • EN 347 British Modernism and Contemporary British Literature (3 Semester Hours)

    This is a study of the Modernist (1903-1945) and contemporary/postmodern (1945-present) periods of British literature, including poetry, short fiction, and novels by a number of influential writers. The course also considers the political, economic, social, intellectual and religious issue and events that shaped and were shaped by Modernist and postmodernist literature.

As well as three semester credit hours from the English Minor Group 2 offering:

  • EN 300 American Literature to 1865 (3 Semester Hours)

    This course is a study of colonial and American literature of the puritan, federalist, and romantic periods. Course has an emphasis on poetry, essays, and fictions. Authors may include Bradstreet, Wheatley, Irving, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Douglass, Stowe, Whitman, and Dickinson, among others.

  • EN 301 American Literature, 1865 to 1914 (3 Semester Hours)

    A study of American literary realism, regionalism, and naturalism, with an emphasis on poetry, essays, and fiction. Authors to be considered may include Davis, Twain, Howells, James, Chesnutt, Chopin, Warton, Crane, Jewett, Norris, Dreiser, and DuBois, among others.

  • EN 302 American Literature, 1914 to Present (3 Semester Hours)

    Class is a study of modernist, post-modernist, and contemporary American literature with an emphasis on poetry, essays, and fiction. Authors that might be covered in this course may include Frost, Eliot, Hughes, Cather, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Hemingway, Hurston, Roth, Morrison, Spiegelman, and Lahiri among others.

  • EN 338 African-American Literature (3 Semester Hours)

    This course examines the formation of the African American literary tradition and the political, economic, social and cultural circumstances that shaped it and were shaped by it.

  • EN 339 Multi-Ethnic American Literature (3 Semester Hours)

    This class is a study of the formation of "American" identity in contemporary literature, considering how race, ethnicity, gender, and class shape and are shaped by literary text.